Sex (Re)Education: What Happens When Women Orgasm?

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Women’s orgasms were simply never discussed when it came to my own sex ed classes. Some teachers will chock this up to the idea that female orgasm, unlike their male counterparts’ don’t serve a biological purpose. In other words, some people suggest male orgasms are talked about in health and sex education classes because in order to understand how fertilization occurs, you have to talk about ejaculation.

But, female orgasms serve their own biological purpose, despite the fact that this information may be omitted from classroom discussions. For instance, when women orgasm it can result in a higher retention of sperm within her vagina–increasing the likelihood of pregnancy.

So, since your teachers probably failed to tell you what exactly goes on when you get off, we’re here to help.

When a woman orgasms, her uterus, vagina, and anus contract all at once. And quickly, too. To be precise, these contractions occur at intervals of 0.8 seconds. Smaller, less intense orgasms may include 3-5 pulsating contractions, while longer more intense orgasms may result in as many as 15 contractions.

It’s these muscle contractions that actually aid in the retention of sperm in the vagina. Contractions that occur during a woman’s orgasm pull sperm from the vagina to the cervix– making fertilization that much easier and more likely for ill adept sperm.

Some women also ejaculate or squirt when they orgasm. Squirting is basically a release of fluid from the urethra that supposedly comes from the Skenes Gland (also known as the female prostate). Science about squirting is hotly debated, some studies suggest that the liquid is actually just urine, while other findings have supported the theory that the fluid is prostate plasma. A lot of people on the internet seem to think that any woman is capable of squirting– it just takes the right type of stimulation. Others think it isn’t real at all and that it’s just some made up phenomenon that was invented by porn. I know a few people who say that they squirt when they orgasm, and because I don’t believe they are lying, I’m going to go ahead and assume squirting is a real thing that can happen– even if science is still debating it.

What is unequivocally true, however is that something called “gushing” can and does occur for some women during orgasm. This is different from squirting in that it involves a thicker, white fluid that comes from the vagina, not the urethra, during or immediately after orgasm.

What purpose this fluid serves in either case is pretty much unknown. You see, scientists don’t exactly have a good track record of studying the female body. Let’s not forget that it wasn’t until 2009 that scientist discovered the full anatomical extent of the clitoris.

And while we’re on the subject of the clitoris and the female orgasm– stimulating that baby is probably your best (or at least, easiest) bet for reaching climax. With over 8,000 sensory nerve fibers, the clitoris is the only part of the human body–male and female– that is purely designed for the purposes of pleasure. So now that you’ve learned all about what happens during your orgasms, go start having some with the help of a little clitoral play.

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