‘Female Viagra’ Isn’t Getting Women Up

The newly FDA-approved ‘female viagra’ sparks controversy as to whether female sexual disinterest in certain women is something that needs to be ‘fixed’ or ‘treated.’ This new pill claims to increase libido for women with a low sex-drive, but the question is, why do we feel the need to ‘pathologize female sexual disinterest?’

Although the pill, Addiy, has been deemed the ‘female viagra,’ it is actually not an accurate comparison. Viagra for men is used to treat erectile dysfunction, or to put it lightly, an inability to ‘get it up.’ Addiy, on the other hand, is not for problems with physiological arousal, but for women with a genuine lack of interest in having sex. The pill acts similarly to an anti-depressant in that it alters one’s dopamine and serotonin levels to effectively produce a sex-drive. But since this pill isn’t to treat an anatomical inability to have sex like Viagra, critics are asking, does it really need to exist?

A particularly low sex-drive in premenopausal women has actually been given a name, Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD). Those raising their concerns from a feminist perspective are wondering why female sexual disinterest needs to be considered a disorder and why it needs to be considered something that medication is necessary for. On the other hand, for some women this could be an actual problem and they do not understand why their libido has decreased. This pill allows those women to get back in touch with their sexuality. Although this pill may be approved by the FDA, it is still up for debate whether female viagra should be available to women due to its controversial purpose.

 


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