Chelsea Wolfe May Be Your Goth Queen, But She Doesn’t Consider Her Music Dark

Chelsea Wolfe dives into the deep Abyss – never afraid of the dark and always in pursuit of exposing reality. Crowned by many as their reigning goth queen, Wolfe doesn’t even consider herself a dark person. Idealistic, yes. Hopeful and positive, yes. But dark isn’t one of them. Her music lies somewhere between metal and folk and like Wolfe, doesn’t need a label. Wolfe’s newest record Abyss is straightforward, heavy and yet another trophy of her uncompromised point of view.

Chelsea Wolfe, Galore, Abyss, Kristin Cofer

“There was one instance, a very long time ago, when I was told to change some lyrics to make them less harsh and more commercial…I didn’t comply.”

“There was one instance, a very long time ago, when I was told to change some lyrics to make them less harsh and more commercial…I didn’t comply.” said Wolfe. Her commitment to her music and unwavering voice of “darkness” has garnered fans from the snobbiest of indie critics to devote metalheads. Since she was a kid, Wolfe was inspired to write songs about reality and much of her personal reality has been the ongoing struggle of sleep paralysis; a terrifying state of being unable to move or speak when a person is either falling asleep or awakening. After reading Carl Jung’s Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Wolfe found inspiration in Jung’s words: particularly “I let myself drop.” She started writing sessions and digging deep; approaching new music with a focused intensity. “I like to take a subject and dissect it, so in a way the album is like different forms of the abyss, or different dreams and nightmares,” said Wolfe.

Chelsea Wolfe, Galore, Abyss, Kristin Cofer

“I think one of the most important lessons you can learn from the exes is what you don’t want in a partner.”

Among the subjects of her dreamworld sessions include the trial and tribulations of love on songs like “Crazy Love”. “A crazy love isn’t necessarily a bad thing,” Wolfe said, “but I think one of the most important lessons you can learn from the exes is what you don’t want in a partner…you can also learn a lot about yourself.” A concept very much rooted in reality for many listeners. Along with this wisdom, Wolfe exposes a raw confidence on Abyss; her voice booming and music electric and smoldering. “Honestly my approach to the album was to let it be raw and vulnerable, and in that way I think I was able to sing more freely, without trying to be too controlled,” said Wolfe.

Chelsea Wolfe, Galore, Abyss, Kristin Cofer

Wolfe finds herself at a peak in both her music and other creative outlets. Most people would never guess that the “goth queen” used to be a massage therapist and enjoys making her own scents. “Growing up I spent a lot of time at my grandmother’s house and she would practice Reiki on me and also make essential oil blends for me based on my energy” Wolfe said, “As I got older I was more into physical touch…I actually worked as a massage therapist for a short time before I pursued music fully but the power of scent always haunted me.” Wolfe started creating her own scents while writing her latest record. Perhaps we can convince her to release the accompanying Abyss fragrance for a truly sensory experience.

Story by: Shannon Kurlander
Photos by: Kristin Cofer


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